‘Fools say grace after meal’

By:
December 16, 2017
272

On a table of three brothers, there is a big slice of loaf bread which can be divided into three portions just enough to suffice the hunger of these people. One man took the loaf bread and cut a little of its part and gave it to his siblings, he devoured the rest of the food as two of his brothers watch. Appalled by the situation, the other brother asked “why only give a little portion to us when the bread can be divided fairly? Aren’t you stealing our part?” The other brother defended, “he stole our part so he could provide more when he’s full, we shall celebrate this selflessness for it is extraordinarily gratifying. Stop accusing him of stealing!”

This is the on-going supper of the educated, the Marcos-allies, and Marcos himself.

From being impolite to the heroes who peacefully rest at the Libingan ng mga Bayani, it seems like the bats in the belfry have invented more kooky ways of honoring their childhood hero, Ferdinand Marcos face.

Just a few weeks ago, the Malacañang palace officially declared September 11 a special non-working holiday in Ilocos Norte to commemorate the 100th birthday of Marcos. I did not react the first time I saw this news on ABS CBN’s website for I thought that it was a shaggy dog story that shall only be amidst the discussion of the mentally-ill. 

When I read the article again, it was already from CNN Philippines, Rappler, and whatnot, name it. I must have checked all the reliable websites for source because the news was “that” funny. My brain reacted by asking questions like “will I celebrate the birthday of the professors who gave me such a hard time in college?” “Would Lincoln possibly rejoice on John Booth’s birthday?” “how is a thief and a dictator’s birthday a ‘holiday’?” This is so far the funniest joke I have added in my Philippine joke book 2017. Hey world! Look at us we are celebrating something that we should never be proud of.

My columns from June up to this God-forsaken month of September have all been issues tackling the demise of my hopes for our country, this time I bet it reached the point where I became so used to it that I can utter no more on issues such as this.

The least we could do as citizens of this nation is to at least notify and educate the people of  what parts in history should be fostered for its beauty, and what parts of history should be remembered as an ailing memory of our democracy. It is so disheartening to see that our own government is the one that leads us to celebrate what is wrong.

Somewhere in the dark circles of hell, Ferdinand Marcos’ remains pile up to form one big fist to punch us right in our faces and laugh at us.

I wish that this on-going joke will not reach the young, because one day, I do not want the Philippines to be run by children who say grace after a very very bad meal.

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